KЛИHOM


Arshile Gorky by anyanka323
January 14, 2010, 9:00 am
Filed under: art, modern
Arshile Gorky, The Artist and His Mother, 1926-36, Whitney Museum of Art

Arshile Gorky, The Artist and His Mother, 1926-36, Whitney Museum of Art

Arshile Gorky, The Song and the Plow, 1946, Art Institute of Chicago

Arshile Gorky, "The Liver and the Cock’s Comb” (1944), Albright-Knox Art Gallery

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Edvard Munch’s Women by anyanka323
May 9, 2009, 12:00 pm
Filed under: art, modern
Edvard Munch, Sister Inger on the Beach, 1889, Bergen Art Museum

Edvard Munch, Sister Inger on the Beach, 1889, Bergen Art Museum

Edvard Munch, Vampire, 1893-4, Munch Museum Oslo

Edvard Munch, Vampire, 1893-4, Munch Museum Oslo

Edvard Munch, Mermaid, 1896, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Edvard Munch, Mermaid, 1896, Philadelphia Museum of Art



Richard Avedon by anyanka323
May 2, 2009, 12:00 pm
Filed under: art, modern, photography
Richard Avedon, Dovima with Elephants, Cirque d'Hiver, Paris 1953

Richard Avedon, Dovima with Elephants, Evening Dress by Dior Cirque d'Hiver, Paris 1955

Richard Avedon, Suzy Parker, Evening Dress by Dior, August 1956

Richard Avedon, Suzy Parker, Evening Dress by Dior, August 1956



Alexander Calder Flamingo by anyanka323
April 11, 2009, 12:00 pm
Filed under: art, modern
Alexander Calder, Flamingo, Chicago, IL

Alexander Calder, Flamingo, Chicago, IL



Russian Modernism by anyanka323
March 21, 2009, 12:00 pm
Filed under: art, modern
Kazimir Malevich, Black Square, 1913, State Russian Museum

Kazimir Malevich, Black Square, 1913, State Russian Museum

Portrait of Anna Akhmatova, by Nathan Altman, 1914. Oil on Canvas. The State Russian Museum.

Portrait of Anna Akhmatova, by Nathan Altman, 1914. Oil on Canvas. The State Russian Museum.



De Stijl architecture by Evan
February 9, 2009, 12:00 pm
Filed under: architecture, art, modern

De Stijl, when applied to architecture, is most generally associated with J.J.P. Oud, Gerrit Rietveld, and Robert van’t Hoff.  Though De Stijl was only active for about 15 years, until Theo van Doesburg’s death, the movement is still very noted in both art and architecture.  After van Doesburg’s death, though, there was no central administration, the journal came to an end, and the members basically went back to whatever they were doing before.  The members didn’t necessarily really know each other; Rietveld famously stated in 1955 that he had never met Piet Mondrian.

Stylistically, De Stijl has everything to do with primary colors and straight lines.  By a few sources, Piet Mondrian left the group because of a disagreement with van Doesburg over whether diagonal lines were as vital and fundamental as vertical and horizontal.  (Van Doesburg claimed they were, while Mondrian disagreed.)

In this post, I’ll profile each of the three major De Stijl architects and some of their works.

First, Gerrit Rietveld.  Rietveld designed the famous “Red and Blue Chair”, which is seen below; for it, he also designed a type of furniture joint that now bears his name.  Additionally, Rietveld was responsible for making what some people claim to be the only building that truly expresses De Stijl principles, the Rietveld-Schröder House, in Utrecht.  I was unable to find sufficient photos of the inside, so I encourage you to go here and take their video tour.  (Alternately, if you’re in the Netherlands, make a reservation and take the real-life tour.)

Red and Blue Chair, Gerrit Rietveld

Red and Blue Chair, Gerrit Rietveld

Rietveld Joint

Rietveld Joint

External picture of the Rietveld-Schröder House, Gerrit Rietveld, Utrecht

External picture of the Rietveld-Schröder House, Gerrit Rietveld, Utrecht

J.J.P. Oud is most famous for works in and around Rotterdam, where he served as a municipal architect during the heyday of De Stijl.  The most famous work of his that exemplifies De Stijl is the Café de Unie in Rotterdam, seen below.  After leaving De Stijl, Oud was part of the Weissenhof Estate Exhibition, where 15 modern architects designed housing.  The second picture below is of a row of five townhouses designed by Oud.

Café de Unie, JJP Oud, Rotterdam

Café de Unie, JJP Oud, Rotterdam

Weissenhof Estate housing, JJP Oud, Stuttgart

Weissenhof Estate housing, JJP Oud, Stuttgart

Robert van’t Hoff designed a bunch of stuff during the early days of De Stijl, before quitting in 1922 to go set up anarchist communities.  One of his more famous designs was a houseboat in which he and his wife lived; unfortunately, pictures do not seem to exist of it online.  What I can offer you are pictures of a house he designed near Utrecht and a banister post.

Henny House, Robert van't Hoff, Utrecht

Henny House, Robert van't Hoff, Utrecht

Banister post, Robert van't Hoff

Banister post, Robert van't Hoff

I’ll leave you with a Piet Mondrian painting: Composition in Yellow, Blue, and Red.

Composition in Yellow, Blue, and Red, Piet Mondrian

Composition in Yellow, Blue, and Red, Piet Mondrian



Coyotes and Felt by bernadette
January 31, 2009, 12:00 am
Filed under: art, modern

Joseph Beuys (1921-1986) was a German artist who created scenes and “Actions” that addressed social upheaval, change, and human isolation. His work often contained ordinary objects transformed into signs of the human condition and lots and lots of felt. In Coyote: I Like America and America Likes Me, Beuys flew to New York, wrapped himself in felt, and was transported via ambulance (so that he would never touch American soil) to a small room containing a coyote in which Beuys would reside for three days. During that time, he wrapped himself in felt and held a cane, got the Wall Street Journal delivered, and allowed the coyote to interact with him. In doing this Action, Beuys hoped to “isolate myself, insulate myself, see nothing of America other than the coyote.”

Joseph Beuys’ Coyote: I Like America and America Likes Me

Intact felt

Intact felt and wild coyote

Further along in the experiment

Further along in the experiment

The following video is a short excerpt of what is almost an hour of these shenanigans. Enjoy.